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2 edition of Quaternary deposits at Hoxne, Suffolk found in the catalog.

Quaternary deposits at Hoxne, Suffolk

R. G. West

Quaternary deposits at Hoxne, Suffolk

by R. G. West

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Published by Royal Society in London .
Written in English


Edition Notes

Statementwith appendices by D.F.W. Baden-Powell, B.W. Sparks, H.E.P. Spencer.
SeriesPhilosophical transactions of the Royal Society of London, series B: Biological sciences -- vol.239, no.665
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL13715013M

Richard West was born in May and began his career at the age of 18 in when he joined the army and spent time in India. On return to England, he came to Clare College, Cambridge in taking Botany and Geology at Part I. Although being tempted to take Geology for Part II, he decided to study Botany, for which he obtained First Class Honours and the Frank Smart Studentship. As a. Schreve DC () The vertebrate assemblage from Hoxne, Suffolk. In: Lewis SG, Preece RC, and Whiteman CA (eds) The Quaternary of Norfolk and Suffolk. Field Guide. London: Quaternary Research Association, Google Scholar.

Residential Lettings. Telephone: Fax: Email: [email protected] Address TW Gaze, 10 Market Hill Diss, Norfolk IP22 4WJ. The lacustrine beds of the sedimentary sequence at Hoxne, Suffolk, containing an Acheulian industry, represent the type site of the penultimate interglacial (Hoxnian) of the British Pleistocene. Recently, on the basis of radiocarbon dating, it has been suggested that the interglacial deposits may date to the last glacial (Weichsel). However, the reliability of this dating is questioned here.

  Electron spin resonance (ESR) dating of British Quaternary deposits has proved particularly problematic (Rink et al., ) and also suffers from additional difficulties in accurately estimating burial conditions. Radiocarbon dating is the most robust method for dating deposits younger than 40 ka, i.e. the last part of the Last Glacial Stage. Pleistocene deposits at Portfield Pit, Westhampnett East, Chichester (TQ ).. New evidence for complex climatic change in MIS 11 from Hoxne, Suffolk, UK: implications for land-ocean correlations and Palaeolithic archaeology.. New evidence for complex climate change in MIS 11 from Hoxne, Suffolk, UK. QUATERNARY SCIENCE REVIEWS.


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Quaternary deposits at Hoxne, Suffolk by R. G. West Download PDF EPUB FB2

NOTES ON THE QUATERNARY DEPOSITS AT HOXNE, SUFFOLK THE deposits at Hoxne are of importance for two reasons, because of the association of a boulder clay with fossiliferous interglacial.

The geology and palaeobotany of Quaternary deposits at Hoxne, Suffolk, Suffolk book been investigated. It is shown that immediately after the ice which laid down the Lowestoft Till had retreated a lake basin was formed in the till.

In the basin a series of interglacial lacustrine sediments was deposited, first clay-mud and later detritus mud. The geology and palaeobotany of Quaternary deposits at Hoxne, Suffolk, have been investigated. It is shown that immediately after the ice which laid down the Lowestoft Till had retreated a lake basin was formed in the till.

In the basin a series of interglacial lacustrine sediments was deposited, first clay-mud and later detritus mud. Reworking of these sediments under a periglacial climate Cited by: The Quaternary Deposits at Hoxne, Suffolk: Appendix 1.

Records of Boreholes and Sections Abstract. Publication: Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society of London Series B. Pub Date: March DOI: /rstb Bibcode: RSPTB full text sources.

XVIII. Account of Flint Weapons discovered at Hoxne in Suffolk. By John Frere, Esq. F.R.S. and F.A.S. In a Letter to the Rev. John Brand, Secretary - Volume 13 - John FrereCited by: A Late Lowcstoftian macroflora is described from a new stratum at Hoxne, Suffolk, underlying the Pleistocene lacustrine beds investigated by West ().

The flora is very similir in aspect to other ‘full‐glacial’ floras described from Gipping and Weichselian deposits in Southern Britain. THE PLEISTOCENE DEPOSITS AT HOXNE, SUFFOLK BY C. TURNER Sub-department of Quaternary Research, Unirersttv of Cambridge (Received 29 Attgust ) A Late Lowcstoftian macroflora is described from a new stratum at Hoxnc, Suffolk, underlying the Pleistocene lacustrine beds investigated by \\ est ().

The flora is very simihir in aspect. Suffolk Institute of Archaeology and History. ,–, BC Hoxne. In John Frere (–) of Roydon Hall in Norfolk wrote a letter to the Society of Antiquaries of London about some flint ‘weapons’ that had been found in a brickpit pit here and observed that from their stratigraphic position they must belong ‘to a very remote period, indeed, even beyond that of the.

As a research student, he was supervised by Harry Godwin, Director of the Subdepartment of Quaternary Research and investigated the now classic study of the stratigraphy and palynology of the Middle Pleistocene interglacial lake deposits at Hoxne, Suffolk. The Clactonian is a stone tool industry dating to MIS 11 and found in southern England.

Its maker is currently thought to be Homo heidelbergensis, a hominin species known to make handaxes in Britain. The importance of the Quaternary deposits both with. ‘The Quaternary deposits at Hoxne, Suffolk’, Phil. Trans Roy. Soc.

London B bibliographies within the books cited it should. Early Hoxnian/late Anglian deposits are found in similar positions above the more extensive Lowestoft Till lithofacies of East Anglia (e.g.

at Hoxne-West, ). Thus, the North Sea Drift ice sheet existed in north-east Norfolk until the late Anglian. Abstract. The giant deer, Megaloceros giganteus, is best known from its fossil occurrences in Ireland around 11 years ago, but has a history across Europe and Western Asia spanning – paper reports a biometric study of variation and evolution in the giant deer through its history.

Most early populations were as large in body size as the Irish sample. The quaternary of Norfolk & Suffolk: field guide R. Preece, C. Whiteman, Simon G. Lewis, Quaternary Research Association (Great Britain) Quarternary Research Association, - Science. QUATERNARY DEPOSITS AT HOXNE, SUFFOLK shell in Pleistocene deposits, can in all probability be included, although no specimens could be found.

personatum, of which no specimens could be traced, may have been a mistake for P. obtusale, which resembles it in some features and which is not uncommon at Hoxne.

Boycott, however, found by experiment that it would live and breed when kept on calcareous soil along with P. elegans (Boycott,29), and Z. excavatus is now known from a sufficiently large number of highly calcareous Quaternary deposits to make it appear probable that some change or restriction of habitat has taken place.

The geology and palaeobotany of Quaternary deposits at Hoxne, Suffolk, have been investigated. It is shown that immediately after the ice which laid down the Lowestoft Till had retreated a lake.

‘ The Quaternary Deposits at Hoxne, Suffolk, and their Archaeology ’, Proceedings of the Prehistoric Society, 20 (part 2), – Willis, G. W., ‘ Hampshire Palaeoliths and the Clay-with-Flints ’, Papers and Proceedings of the Hampshire Field Club, 16 (part 3), –6.

The old pipeworks lies in open countryside on the eastern side of Eye Road, Hoxne. The site is internationally famous for the discovery by antiquarian John Frere of palaeolithic tools during clay extraction inwhen the site operated as the brickworks of the Hoxne.

The Quaternary deposits at Hoxne, Suffolk and their archaeology. Proceedings of the Prehistoric Soci pp. – Woillard G.M. Grande Pile peat.

Author of Pleistocene geology and biology, Problems of the British quaternary, Studying the past by pollen analysis, Studies in the vegetational history of the British Isles: essays in honour of Harry Godwin, Pleistocene geology and biology, with especial reference to the British Isles, The pre-glacial Pleistocene of the Norfolk and Suffolk coasts, The Quaternary deposits at Hoxne, Suffolk.

Quaternary Science Journal - The Palaeoecology of the Interglacial Deposits at Histon Road, Cam Published on Von den interglazialen Schichten in .The Quaternary deposits at Hoxne, Suffolk. Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society of London, Series B., – WEST R.G.

Pleistocene forest history in East Anglia. New Phytologist, – OPEN ACCESS Journal + Issues. Acta Palaeobotanica.